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I was doing software development in the past with my own company. I no longer have that company.

However, I published some small utilities which were especially made for SR, because I thought there's no good solution available yet. These tools were hosted on the server of the company.

While the domain still exists, the links are broken. Sometimes people inform me about it, which is fine. However, it will take some time to make the tool open source and in the meanwhile people need to wait.

How would I proactively find answers of myself which have a broken link? Thus I could go through these and make the code open source before someone finds out that the link is broken.

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Great question.

I'm not aware of any built-in StackExchange functionality for community members (or community moderators) to do this.

I am, however, aware of a Firefox extension that may help. It's called "Broken Link Checker", and is available here:

https://addons.mozilla.org/firefox/addon/find-broken-links/

The extension is gratis and open source.

It has a "deep search" function, and it's possible that performing a deep search on the following page will yield the results you desire:

https://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com/users/1935/thomas-weller?tab=answers

I hope it winds up working for you. If not, I bet @SteveBarnes could whip something up in Python to do the job!

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  • Good idea. Unfortunately it seems Stack Exchange has a built-in DoS (denial of service) detection. I tried it, but soon I got a lot of HTTP 429 "Too many requests" error. And now I can't even posts comments. May 28 at 8:04
  • I'd not base that "crawl" on that URL, but rather on a search with user:me and the domain name. That would limit it to much fewer links to check. Extract those, and use a tool like linkchecker locally from your machine, feeding it the URLs and add a proper sleep between the calls. Doesn't matter if it needs 24h, you can have it set-and-forget, checking the results the other day.
    – Izzy Mod
    May 28 at 8:59

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